Legacy Project

Nominate a Planning Legend

Perhaps it’s your mentor. Maybe it’s a colleague. Or even an individual who inspires you. Planning legends surround us. They are individuals who fought important community, land use, legal, and social battles that made our region what it is today. Our Chapter seeks to identify and honor these individuals as planning legends in our first Legacy Project.

We need your help! Nominate someone whose legacy inspired and opened doors for the generations of practitioners who have come after them. Nominations are being accepted through Friday, December 11, 2015 via this online form. You can also download the form and submit via email to APAlegacyproject@gmail.com.

Legacy Project – Background

The National Capital Area Chapter of the American Planning Association seeks your input to identify individuals who would be considered as “planning legends” for the Chapter’s first Legacy Project. Nominations will be vetted by a committee comprised of Chapter members and subsequently honored at a special event (to include a documentary and a panel discussion which highlights their accomplishments). The individuals will also receive a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Chapter. Your help is appreciated in identifying people who fall into the following description:Planning legends are those individuals who entered the profession roughly 40 or 50 years ago, and who have made important imprints on the National Capital Area Chapter region through their personal and professional actions. The region is defined as Washington, D.C. and Montgomery and Prince George’s counties in Maryland. Their legacy has inspired and opened doors for the generations of practitioners who have come after them. They have fought important community, land use, legal, and social battles that have made our region what it is today.

Emphasis will be placed on planners who began their careers in this region in the 1960s. This period predates the construction of the Washington Metrorail rapid transit system (which opened in 1976 and expanded into Maryland in 1978), the 1973 District of Columbia Home Rule Act which provided for an elected mayor and the 13-member Council of the District of Columbia, and the long term effects of the 1968 riots.

For additional information about the project, please contact APAlegacyproject@gmail.com.